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, fiscal cliff threatening the economy, but maybe not? we take it all up with moody's chief economist, and deutsche bank senior economist here next. stay with us. lou: you know, it may surprise some that december is historically the strongest month for investors. the s&p500 posting gains in december, 82% of the time since 1990. it's that 18% that should trouble folks, but are concerns with the fiscal cliff giving investors a reason to be less than optimistic? joining me is john, and carl, senior economist for deutsche bank. gentlemen, thank you for being here. start with the treasury secretary. the man in charge of our treasury is out telling everyone that the administration he works for is a part of is perfectly prepared to go over the fiscal cliff in order to raise a tax rate to 39.6%. does that make any sense to you? are you shocked, surprised? >> well, i guess i'm not surprised given we're in the early stages of the discussion, but for the economists and forecasters out there calling this is the fiscal slope, not a cliff or believe it's worthwhile to go over the cliff, it's not th
be wise to look beyond the fiscal cliff because all the fears it's tomorrow doing the economy are misplaced. >> most economists have said if we go into 2013 without a deal we'll go into recession. >> we might have into 2013 for three days or knife days or a week before there's a deal. that's about it. the pressure from financial markets will be too great so the scenario that you just referred to to, we go over the cliff, had and the economy sinks. i want to emphasize that cannot happen. >> let me move on to another topic. timothy geithner has said he's not returning for another four years. your name has been mentioned as a replacement. >> of course they are not going to make any changes during that team during the pennedsy of all of this. the president has lots of good choices for whatever comes next. i very much doubt that i'll be part of that but they are in good shape and they don't have anything to do about this. do youly jack lew would be a good treasury secretary. fiscal issues will continue to be and the for foernt even after after agreement on the cliff and the preside
cliff? are you expecting the economy to go over the fiscal cliff and see these taxes go high hadder and spending cuts take effect? >> my personal view is i'm still optimistic. i think the conversation has been constructive since. do we have a solution on the table yet? no. but i'm optimistic we'll get to a framework. >> why? >> there's been enough dialogue. there's been movement. everyone seems to recognize the problem. everybody realizes there has to be a revenue component, spend component, entitlement reform component. for us, the business community and all the ceos, certainty is the greatest stimulus for us. >> do you support tax rates going higher? >> me personally, as an individual, more importantly the business community, which i'm part of. we support something inclusive. if rates were higher in a videocasset vacuum, i'm not sure we'd be supportive of that. we have to make sure the consumers, those who spends a lot of the dollars, the middle class, are protected in this exercise. >> i guess the question i'm really getting at is, do you get the revenue from tax increases or fro
about the prosepects of the economy going over the fiscal cliff? > > angie, it has been a very interesting trade in this space recently. people look to gold as the safe haven, yet we have seen gold prices come off about 5% over the last couple months. and in fact, yesterday was just touching a major support area, both psychologically and technically, right around that $1,700-an-ounce level. now, you would think that if the gold market, or people trading gold, were really that concerned about the fiscal cliff, that would be the safehaven, and we wouldn't see this major sell- off. but, we are seeing that, and actually if we break through this $1,700 level, the next major area of support is down about another 5%, around $1,620. > so the fact that people are not rushing to gold tells you that there is a chance that maybe things will be ok. > > exactly. > good to have you on the show. that's scott bauer of trading advantage. > > thanks angie. newly-elected massachusettes senator elizabeth warren will reportedly take a seat on the senate banking committee. the huffington post reports
the fiscal cliff, that the economy will see a contraction of a couple of percentage points. where are you on earnings for 2013, what are your expectations? >> maria, look at the s&p numbers, looking for a slow single digit percentage gains. for this period of the fourth quarter looking for gains in telecommunications and financials. i think the critical part, investors ought to be very keen just to weigh in the risk, you know, and the fact they had a very rewarding year in 2012, we were up about 12% on the s&p 500. earnings will be very much held captive by the fact that the uncertainty not only about the fiscal cliff but debt ceiling. >> very quickly, john, we're lose altitude in this market rapidly. what do you make of this, and what are you expecting to close here? >> just shows you how fragile our markets r.one comment out of washington can take profits off the table intraday. we'll hold on to our gains here. >> thanks, everybody. we appreciate it. where exactly do we stand in these fiscal cliff negotiations in the latest now from our john harwood, on your stomping ground. good to see
a deal on the fiscal cliff, or that they drag it out over a number of months. and that that really erodes confidence. >> repoer: against that backdrop, the federal reserve is trying to do all it can to help the economy. the central bank is widely expected to announce an extension of its bond buying program when it meets next week. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: with the fiscal cliff about three weeks away, washington hasn't made much progress to avoid it. that was the assessment from one of those directly involved: house speaker john boehner. the top republican today accused president obama of, "slow walking", the economy to the edge of the cliff. he repeated his call for the president to send congress a plan that can pass both houses of congress. tax rates are the major sticking point. the president wants to raise them for america's highest earners, house republicans strongly oppose: >> instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue
an affect on the economy, even though we have not even reached the point of the fiscal cliff, potentially kicking in, it is already affecting business investment and hiring decisions by creating uncertainty and pessimism, we see what happens to consumer sentiment which fell because of concerns about the fiscal cliff. this is a major risk factor and major source of uncertainty about the economy going forward. i would suspect, although the participants don't make this explicit, but what they are sitting in their projections is the fiscal cliff gets resolved and some intermediate way, there's still fiscal drag not flags by the entire fiscal cliff so that is the underlying assumption that most people took when they made their projections but you are absolutely right that they're a lot of uncertainty right now and the fiscal cliff situation to be resolved in a way different from expectations you would see changes in the forecast. [inaudible] >> thanks very much, mr. chairman. could you talk about whether the decision to maintain the purchase of $85 billion a month represents are ramping up of
to understand given how much going over the fiscal cliff would hurt the economy. why is going over the fiscal cliff worth it for just this one component? if you can get the other components, why wouldn't you take that? >> good question. thanks for asking. what we're trying to do is put in place a comprehensive balance set of fiscal reforms that put us back on the path to living within our means and create room for investing to make the economy stronger, make sure we're protecting medicare for future generations, and forcing the government to use the taxpayers' resources more wisely. in that context, you have to have a significant amount of revenues. we don't see a way of doing it that makes any sense or has any political viability without rates going up as part of that deal. again, the size of the problem in some sense is so large it can't be solved without rates going up. i think there's a broad recognition of that reality now. if you listen carefully to the talk not just in this town, but you hear what businesses and investors say, i think there's broad recognition that rates are going to g
have had otherwise. just imagine that. the fiscal cliff is going cost the economy in that order of magnitude, 3 million jobs. we should not, not, not go over that cliff. now -- >> by the same token, though, his point about -- and i don't want to make this about ed. the fact remains that the debt levels we have in this country in effect put a cap on growth right now. >> sure, sure, sure. i think that economists have been saying for years -- i have said repeatedly, economists on both sides of the aisle have said repeatedly what we need is a long-term plan for deficit reduction that begins to take effect when the economy is closer to its capacity. right now it's at least 6% below its capacity. the unemployment rate, 7.7, it should be like 5.7 at capacity. we should not be doing a lot of deficit reduction right now. we want to sends a credible message to markets that we're serious about deficit reduction, but to put it in place in that brutal way, $600 billion next year, forget it. that's not good economics. >> there is a school of thought that says that we just have to get used to
has already been pointed out. we need to spur this economy and of the fiscal cliff developed and small-businesses our hits we have to have growth somewhere and that could be a way of doing it. >> who of wants to pick this up do we go over the fiscal cliff? >> yes. probably. 55% to 60% and early january they strike some kind of deal that allows the administration to say there decreasing taxes from what they went to in january 1st. i say 60% we are going over the cliff. dave: we are playing with fire if that happens. a lot of people say even if it is temporary it might push us into recession. quickly, you think that is possible that we will? >> certainly possible. interesting the consensus have gone from 50% to 60%. a month or two ago we were not going to go over the cliff. i agree that is completely flipped on its head and the only president in recent memory who headed debt ceiling in summer of 2011, all through july everyone was confident we were going to get a deal and we saw what happened. a little bit of cash on the sidelines to reload the. of the goal of the cliff, is not a bad thi
republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not ique to citi; it's indtry- wide. a financial
strategy to a slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. gerri: earlier i asked republican senator richard shelby of alabama for his take on the comments from boehner. >> i believe that speaker boehner is on the right track. the president has not come uptown now, been deeply involved, that we know about , in any of these offers are counteroffers. dealers said he has been campaigning to meet. but he has to get involved if he wants to avoid the fiscal cliff. i think that the speaker has indicated that he will try to engage in, try to meet him and try to avoid the fiscal cleft that the presiient is going to continue to say it is my way or the highway, that is another game. gerri: it is. harry reid today saying that the game is at chess game, and the republicans are the jets. here is harry reid. >> he has a problem. he has three quarterbacks. he cannot decide who the quarterback is going to be. that is the same problem republicans are having. romney is gone, but he is still in the background. we have mcconnell and boehner. who is the quarterback, mr. president? gerri
-walks this process, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff." "we have been calling on the speaker to bring forth a middle-income tax cut now for a very long time - in fact, since last summer when it passed the united states senate." here's a side-by-side check of where they stand: the president's plan calls for a raising $1.6 trillion in revenue by boosting tax rates on the incomes above $200,000 for individuals and $250,000 for couples. president obama also recommends $400 billion in spending cuts. representative boehner's calls for $800 billion in new revenue, $600 billion in savings from medicare and medicaid, and $300 billion from other domestic programs. in a big slip for small business, confidence took a tumble in november. the national federation of independent business says its confidence index of small biz owners dropped 5.6 points last month - that's one of the largest drops the study has ever shown. the group says the fiscal fiasco in washington, along with the upcoming healthcare overhaul, is shattering optimism within the sector. however, it's not all doom and gloom. some busi
a deliberate strategy to a slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. are you emotionally moved? do you think the nation is galvanized? >> i don't know if the nation is galvanized in the but i will be honest to my nervous about this. i view the clippers a genuine economic threat and a recipe for recession. we heard the secretary of treasury said earlier this week that he was prepared to go over the cliff, which i found shocking as the top economic official in an administration. if that is the strategy, it is a very, very dangerous one. lou: it is clear, the speaker made a clear, he believes that is precisely what the president wants to do and will do. as you say, it is stunning to watch the principal economic financial figures in the obama administration be leading a political negotiation rather than, if you will, minding over an economy filled with 23 million people unemployed all sorts of challenges at every corner from and he is now politician. it is stunning. i want to get your comments, if i made, on something that nancy pelosi said today, which reported at the top of
the president is slow walking our economy to the fiscal cliff. former reagan white house counsel, financial crisis inquiry commission member peter wallace will join me here in just moments. let's take a look at tonight's "moneyline." the dow and s&p managing gains. the nasdaq weighed down by another bad day for apple and its investors. the dow up 81 points. s&p up four, the nasdaq fell leaven. just over 3 billion shares traded on the big board today. the dow up 1%, s&p slightly higher making three straight weeks of wins. the nasdaq down 1% for its first losing week of the past three. apple investors are having a rough time wih the dow down. the stock down 9 percent this week. but even with that selling, the stock remains up 30% year-to-date. wall street analysts say much of the selling can be explained by investors looking to avoid possibly having to pay gains on the sale of that stock at a higher rate next year. others simply taking profits. financial stocks strong. today j.p. morgan chase led the weight. news that it is expanding the numbers of its branch offices. research shows consumers
chairman and cleveland cabs owner dan gilbert, the economy, investing and the fiscal cliff when "squawk box" returns. if you think running a restaurant is hard, try running four. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. you know, one job or the other. the moment i could access the retirement plan, i just became firm about it -- "i'm done. i'm out of here." you know, it's like it just hits you fast. you know, you start thinking about what's really important here. ♪ ♪ the latest coffee machine from nespresso. modular. intuitive. combines espresso and fresh milk. the new u. nespresso. what else? available at these fine retailers. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. [ male announcer ] bre
in the fiscal cliff issue. everybody is obsessed what happens because we're the biggest economy and what we do will affect everybody. everybody including sovereign well funds want to know what has happened. >> what do you tell them? >> i tell them it's unlikely a deal won't be reached. i don't know whether it's december 23 or 24 or 28. very unlikely a deal won't be reached. >> what about post january 1st? >> we're talking about a deal nine months of this fiscal year, we have nine months left of it. we're talking a down payment and have the next nine months and talking about a down payment to make it go away in terms of fiscal cliff for january 1 and still have a lot next year. >> you're as close to wall street guy washington insider, that's what carlyle is, what have you seen behind the scenes or conversations that has made you this optimistic? >> i talked to people in congress and people involved in negotiations and my belief is they know a deal has to be done and each side wants to posture themselves not to give away the things they shouldn't give away. i'm pretty sure they know a deal has t
than $600 billion in tax increases and spending cuts kick in. the fiscal cliff potentially sending the economy into recession. the fear of the cliff. is that putting a veil over your eyes and pretending you seeing good news that could make better trades for your portfolio? you need to see the forest for the trees. to help do that, liz saunders in a fox business exclusive, charles schwab's vice president and chief investment strategist. what is the biggest mistake that the investor is making right now as it pertains to navigating that very rocky fiscal cliff landscape? >> they are trying to trade around perceived outcomes. that is fairly treacherous. we don't get a sense that a lot of investors are doing that -- [talking over each other] liz: there were buying in on the dips because they are trading around he headlines. >> there's a lot of tax related strategy happening right now, many of which make a lot of sense, but i have asked the question of loss, what would you put money on a particular outcome? i wouldn't. that is a dangerous strategy. >> one scenario could be as damaging a
. >> this is in the progress report because thereis no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is turning our economy and jobs, the white hhuse is wasted another week. gerri: what do y say? we wasted another week. we seem to be getting nowhere, and now folks are saying the president is trying to entice us of the fiscal cliff. >> look, i think they're actuly some pretty strong incentives for the president to take the country over the fiscal cliff. if you lo at what the president's stance to gain if the country goes over the fiscal cliff, here are very clear and identifiable things. on the one hand the president could idenfy himself as a tax cutter. he could say -- on january 1st the president in terms of the country and say, now in favor of cutting these taxes that have been raised because we did not solve this before the fiscal cliff. he can turn and say to my want to restore some of this funding that my secretary ofefense and joint chiefs of staff told me i need to restore and can position himself as sort of the protector of u.s. national security. so there are som clear incentives to th
to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code, the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president that the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we will continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. washington has a spending3 problem, not a revenue problem. if the president does not agree with our proposal, i believe he has an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week, can you characterize that call. also, it has to be increases in rates for the wealthy or no deal. >> the phone call was pleasant, but more of the same. it is time for the president to be serious and come back with a counter offer. [inaudible question] >> the risk the president wants us to take, increasing tax rates will hit many small businesses that produce 60-70% of the new jobs in our country. that is the whole issue. [inaudible question] >> i think that is reckless talk. [inaudible question] >> listen, raising
. the longer the white house slow walks this discussion, the closer our economy gets to the fiscal cliff, and the more american jobs are placed in jeopardy. >> good morning. the president has said on a daily basis that we should be passing a balanced plan. but what we hear from the president is continuing only discussion on one side of the ledger. it has always been about tax rate increases, and nothing about spending. and we insist, say, look, mr. president, let's talk about a balanced plan, but where are your specifics on the spending cuts? even his own advisers say that any kind of agreement that we come to has to deal with the prime drivers of our deficit, which is the spending, particularly the health care entitlement programs. so we ask the president to please sit down with us and be specific and let's get that balanced plan. you know, it's interesting that the senate has passed a bill that is a bill calling for increased revenues of $850 billion. the president continues to say, support that bill, pass that bill. well, how is that the case when he continues to say we also need $1.4
on entrepreneurs. it is the secret sauce that's built the american economy. >> what about the fiscal cliff? you brought it up. do you think they will take us over the cliff at this point and how damaging if that happens would it be not only to entrepreneurship but to the country as a whole? >> i think it will be troubling. hopefully they won't. i know there is a lot of posturing and hopefully a lot of quiet negotiations happening and hopefully there will be a resolution that can build pore. it is important not just for the fiscal cliff. i think the country and actually the world is looking at washington saying can these guys work together in a collaborative bipartisan way to deal with fiscal issues, our entrepreneurship issues, we have to start building that bipartisan support. congress did come together, republicans and democrats, house and senate with support of the white house to pass the jobs act around access to capital for entrepreneurs so we have some example of that. hopefully that momentum will continue not just on the fiscal cliff in the coming weeks but issues like the start-up act 2
to be any closer to a resolution on the fiscal cliff even though many are warning that the economy could face dire consequences if there is no agreement but one strategist says, why are you worrying about december 31st? that deadline isn't even the real fiscal cliff. david: that strategist is none other than peter schiff, ceo of europacific precious metals. friend of the show. peter, although i wish it was under better circumstances. you say the real cliff coming is bigger han the housing mess, bigger than the housing crisis we went through. it's the bond mess. specifically when the fed stops printing money to buy up treasurys all hell will break loose, right? >> well, and if it continues to print money it will be a bigger hell. if we avoid the fiscal cliff we end up throwing the dollar over the currency cliff because we send a message to the world america will never pay its bills. we'll keep borrowing money until the creditors cut us off. that is when interest rates skyrocket. the pressure on the fed and if the fed caves in to buy up all the bonds nobody wants we destroy the dollar. th
, the economy and the looming fiscal cliff. jpmorgan chairman ceo jamie dimon. carlyle group cofounder david rubenstein and a lot more. and it all starts tomorrow at 6:00 a.m. eastern on "squawk box." [ male announcer ] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more
covering the economy and fiscal cliff negotiations. we will have it live for you when it happens after the top of the hour on "street signs." i think that's why the mark set stuck right now. we were up about 30 point. we lot of a little p. we are up 17 now. s&p 500 is up a half point. in terms of the nasdaq, we are up just about 7 point. steve grasso is with us. what does the market want it hear from the president at 2:00? >> they want to hear a deal is close to booeb beieing done. fund managers don't want to take a leg and step into the abyss of the fiscal cliff. >> absolutely. we heard a short term patch is not going to avoid us from another drown grade. if you are a fund manager, do you punt in december? i think not. you wait. >> does downgrade matter? >> you did see the collapse in the market because the market always is a good lead time for you. so leading indicator. . the best leading indicator is the s&p 500 so we have seen just sitting here in no man's land. >> it is as flat as my ekg. >> god for bid. >> yeah. >> normally, might well be a big topic. >> did you say anything? >>
is reached on a fiscal cliff deal, that's a big if, serious problems with the economy will remain and it's time to ask the tough questions about the middle class. joining us now, lindsey piegza, economist with ftn financial. lindsey, as always thanks for being here. you say businesses and consumers will face hash realities next year regardless of what washington does on the fiscal cliff. what are those realities? >> right now everyone is very much focused getting a compromise done but even if we get the president's plan, even if we get the republican's plan very likely that shaves growth down to under 1% for the first half of the year. that is dismal outlook regardless whether or not we come to a compromise. that is much more positive outlook than falling off the cliff outright but still doesn't set us up for long-term growth. plus neither one of these proposes asks the tough questions of the middle class saying long term do we want to take on a bigger tax burden or do we want to cut the social programs? the conversation to me seems very disingenuous when we're talking about 100 trillion
in this country should of course we go over that fiscal cliff. what is that going to do to the economy and ability to create jobs next year? >> the last thing the economy needs right now is for a big tax hike on the middle class. the $2,200 tax increase for the typical family you alluded to, we calculate that would cause consumer spending to fall by $200 billion next year. that would cut the growth of consumption by 1.7 percentage points and shave 1.4 percentage points off gdp growth. there's a simple solution here which is just to extend middle class tax cuts which the senate has already done. >> we got good numbers this morning. i'm willing to take them at face value. better than a bid. not great. we want 400,000 jobs. do we still need to spend so much money on the payroll tax cut and extended unemployment gains given the fact that we got good news today? >> first and foremost, we need to extend middle class tax cuts. that should be our highest priority. the economy can still use support in the short-term. i think the more we do for the long-term to show that we're on a fiscally sustainable path
to be 33%. the winner, the fiscal cliff, 35%. what are people saying about the fiscal cliff? we have people write in, and i believe that's what we'll look at next. we'll look at the probability of a u.s. recession. that has come up. in part because of the fiscal cliff concerns. it was 19% back in march. a high of 36%. so we're halfway between the low and the high pretty much. this is a 13-month high for the probability of recession. now we want to show you what people are saying about the fiscal cliff, allowing the economy to go over the cliff would be extremely reckless, says donnelly. they're going out to try to help the unemployment rate. wall street doesn't believe it's going to happen. they do believe it will help lower mortgage rates and the unemployment rate and not a lot of help expected for the stock market. melissa? >> steve, thanks for that. that's interesting stuff there. >> nothing like getting your blood pressure up. liesman testing you live on tv. >> what do you think? wrong, wrong. brought back bad memories, huh, carl? 2013 housing market outlook this morning, according to t
on the fiscal cliff. when you are focused on uncertainty, what do you do, you do nothing. those are the major implementations for the economy. cheryl: i can hear the hesitancy in your voice. a lot of our guests are saying the same thing. they are afraid of what washington will do or maybe not do. your outlook is a bit more bullish than some of your colleagues. what are you saying in the second half of 2013 that others are not? >> on a very short-term basis, we have noticed there are a couple of things. the fiscal cliff. we cannot get out of the way of that. if you look at to the second half of 2013 that we can get some resolution, we may not like the total resolution, but if we can, you move past a period of uncertainty. three things have started in 2012 that could accelerate in 2013. housing is key. cheryl: it has done incredibly well this year. >> the second aspect is what is going on with the energy field, in terms of technology and energy less dependence for the u.s. the third factor is what is going on in manufacturing. you can talk about the creation of jobs in the u.s. economy. if you
-frank, with respect to where are our national economies going, where is the leadership? and we have the fiscal cliff in the united states. we're three weeks away from that. it's incomprehensible to me personally that we can still be facing that issue -- david: is a possible recession on the horizon? >> well, i hope not. i think that the ramifications of the fiscal cliff, um, will be important. i'm optimistic that we're going to get some leadership in washington that'll actually save us from having to go off that cliff or down that hill, if you will. but i think we are -- there's uncertainty. and whenever there's uncertainty, the market will have less volume in it. liz: tom kloet, good to see you. >> thanks for having me. liz: ceo of the tmx group. david: a u.s. plant right in the heart of canada. they don't realize it yet. [laughter] good to see you. >> thank you. david: well, is now the time to buy apple? a morningstar senior equity analyst thinks so and says some of the blame for the recent decline should fall on washington. why? find out why, coming next. liz: plus, choice hotels expanding its up
the country, i think this whole issue around taxes and around the fiscal cliff generally leads to something else, which is significant uncertainty. and whether it is delaware or whether it is any other state, one of the things that is most important to us is having business leaders have some kind of certainty about what the ground rules are going to be. not just for the next three months, by the way. but really for the next several years. they're more likely to invest, more likely to hire their next employee if they know what the game looks like. what the landscape looks like. and so as much as anything else, we think having that certainty, having that clarity on taxes and spending, is really important. >> susie: you said you are also very concerned about where growth is going to come from. did you discuss that with the president, won did he say, aside from tax increases and spending cuts? >> one of the things we specifically talked about was infrastructure. it didn't used to be that roads and bridges were democrat or republican. we need to continue to invest in our infrastructure, a strong
now. >> susie: your whole forecast is depending on an agreement on fiscal cliff. if we go over the cliff, what happens to your forecast. what will you be saying at the start of the year about the outlook for the economy and jobs. >> a lot of people are focused on the january 1st deadline. we don't think if we don't have an agreement by january 1st that everything falls apart. what we're watching very closely is if there is still negotiating taking place. if we still see both sides talk, i don't think the january 1st deadline is going to mean that much. we would only worry about the worst-case scenario with the economy contracting if there is a real stalemate and both parties walk away from the talks. we don't expect that. we're beginning to see some signs there is some willingness to compromise on both parties. >> susie: as we said from the start, you're pretty positive on the outlook. gary thayer of wells fargo advisor. >> susie: los angeles and long beach port workers were back at work today, ending a costly eight-day strike. the ports were crippled after clerical workers wen
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 82 (some duplicates have been removed)